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Movember

Movember takes place every November, as a way to raise awareness of prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health and suicide prevention.

“Our fathers, brothers, sons and friends are dying by suicide, every minute of every day.

We won’t accept this. To make change happen, Movember views mental health through a male lens. We focus on early intervention, engaging men and working to their strengths. By 2030, we aim to reduce the rate of male suicide by 25%.

Men with prostate cancer and testicular cancer face an uphill battle before, during and after treatment. But with useful tools and straight-shooting advice, we aim to lighten their load so these men can live life to the fullest.

Globally, men die on average 6 years earlier than women, and for largely preventable reasons.

So we’re shining a light on the health risks men need to know about, increasing awareness to stop men dying too young.”

What you can do

  • Grow – grow a moustache through the month of November to raise awareness and funds for Movember.
  • Move – over November run or walk 60km on behalf of the 60 men we lose to suicide every hour across the world.
  • Host – throw a Mo-ment event and gather your friends, family or coworkers to raise spirits and funds on behalf of Movember.

If you have concerns regarding your physical or mental health this November, book in to speak to our supportive and understanding GPs. Atticus Health is now a HALT-friendly clinic, supporting and prioritising mental health.

Opiate Replacement Programs

Atticus Health’s Dr Hardik Solanki has undertaken additional training of a course titled Medical-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Dependence. This course was designed to enhance medical practitioners’ knowledge and skills on opiate replacement programs.

Opiate replacement programs are in place to assist those with opioid addictions. These addictions can lead to opioids being misused for extended periods of time, which can be debilitating or even life-threatening. The replacement of suboxone, which can be prescribed by a trained GP, can assist with addiction recovery. Suboxone works by keeping withdrawal symptoms at bay.

A patient who comes to their GP seeking help with an opiate addiction may be provided with a prescription for Suboxone, and those suffering from addiction and dependency will be referred to Peninsula Health’s Frankston and Mornington Peninsula Drug and Alcohol Service (FaMDAS). Additionally, they will have regular monitoring and counselling by a trained GP.

Opiate replacement programs have a good rate of success with the conviction and dedication from the patient. These programs take into consideration the fact that each person requires a personal and individual approach. As addiction is commonly associated with other mental health issues, the treatment will also aim at helping patients deal with mental health issues for their overall health and wellbeing.

Knowledge and experience in these programs also allow GPs to assist people who are living with friends or family suffering from addiction. If you think this service would benefit you or somebody you are close to, book in now to take the first step to recovery.

 

Foot Health Month

This year’s Foot Health Month focuses on the theme of promoting podiatry. The Foot Health Month campaign seeks to remind the public about the significance of good foot health and encourage people to seek more information about the services that podiatrists offer.

Podiatry is a growing profession. In 1999, there were 2,011 podiatrists in practice. By 2016, this number jumped to 4,399. According to Podiatry Board of Australia industry statistics, the rapid growth of podiatry is reflected in the youthfulness of the profession, with close to 40 per cent of practicing podiatrists being under 35 years of age.

One of the most serious foot health issues is lower limb amputation resulting from complications of diabetes. APodC CEO Damian Mitsch says focusing on proper foot care has the potential to reduce the effects of diabetic foot among Australians.

“Unfortunately, Australia performs very poorly against other developed nations in terms of diabetes-related lower-limb amputations. In fact, we have the second-worst rates in the developed world – an avoidable amputation takes place every 2-3 hours in Australia,” says Mitsch.

“In additional to this social cost, the financial burden on the healthcare system is extraordinary, with each lower-limb amputation costing $26,000 plus aftercare costs.”

“Proper podiatric care has the potential to dramatically prevent amputation for a patient with a diabetic foot condition. Foot issues need to be identified and treated quickly and consistently to stop a minor wound becoming infected, ulcerated and, ultimately, resulting in the loss of limb to save someone’s life,” Mitsch added.

If you believe you have foot health needs, book in to see Chloe today.

Atticus Podiatrist Chloe Middlemass

World Osteoporosis Day

Osteoporosis is a common disease that affects around 1.2 million Australians. Osteoporosis occurs when bones lose minerals, such as calcium, more quickly than the body can replace them, causing the bones to become brittle. This leads to a higher risk of bone breakage than a normal bone.

Osteoporosis is thought of as a ‘silent disease’, as it rarely shows symptoms before the brittleness of the bones leads to a fracture. As the bones lose density and strength, a fracture – partial or complete break of the bone – can be caused by a minor bump or fall.

Who is at risk?

2019’s World Osteoporosis Day is focused on men making bone health a priority – “Real men build their strength from within“. Osteoporosis is often thought to be a women’s disease, as women are at a higher risk after menopause. When estrogen levels decrease, the bones lose calcium and minerals at an elevated rate. As testosterone levels lower more gradually, the deterioration of men’s bones may happen at a slower pace. However, there are many factors that can lead to the development of osteoporosis. These include:

  • Family history – If family members have a history of osteoporosis or broken a bone from a minor fall or bump, these can be indicators of low bone density.
  • Medical history – Low hormone levels, some chronic diseases and some medicines for breast and prostate cancer can increase your risk of osteoporosis.
  • Vitamin D and calcium levels – Both vitamin D and calcium are essential for bone health, and low levels put you at risk.
  • Lifestyle factors – Low exercise levels, smoking history, extremely low or high weight and excessive alcohol intake all contribute to your risk of developing osteoporosis.

Detection

If you are over 50 and present with any of the osteoporosis risk factors, then it is recommended that you get a bone density scan. This is a simple scan that takes approximately 10-15 minutes. If you are concerned that you may be at risk of osteoporosis, book in with your GP for them to determine if you should be referred for a bone density scan.

Prevention

There are steps you can take to prevent osteoporosis. In addition to living a generally healthy lifestyle, there are 3 main approaches to take to lower your risk of osteoporosis:

  • Calcium – Victoria State Government’s Better Health Channel provides you with information on recommended calcium intake for different ages and life stages.
  • Vitamin D – Vitamin D aids in the absorption and regulation of calcium, while also supporting growth and maintenance of the skeleton.
  • Exercise – To build and maintain bone strength, it is important to focus on the right kind of exercise. Weight-bearing exercise and progressive resistance training both work the muscles and bones sufficiently to increase bone strength.

To find the right exercise regime for your body, you can make an appointment to see Nikki, our exercise physiologist. She is available at our Hastings and Carrum clinics for personal and group classes, depending on your needs.